Why is Pop Smoke Considered Afro-Latino?

Why is Pop Smoke Considered Afro-Latino? Pop Smoke was an up-and-coming rapper who was shot and killed in February of 2020. He was only 20 years old. Pop Smoke was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Jamaican mother and an African-American father. His mother is from Spanish Town, Jamaica and his father is from South Carolina. Pop Smoke considered himself to be Afro-Latino because of his Jamaican heritage. He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Panamanian mother and a Jamaican father. Even though he was born and raised in the United States, he is considered Afro-Latino because of his Latin American roots.

Pop Smoke’s music was a mix of hip-hop and drill. The drill is a style of rap that originated in Chicago. It is characterized by its dark, violent, and often aggressive lyrics. Pop Smoke’s music often contained references to his Afro-Latino identity. For example, in the song “Invincible,” he raps: “I’m not Latin Kings, but I get the crown/And all this money, it’s gon’ make me bounce.”

Why is Pop Smoke Considered Afro-Latino?
Why is Pop Smoke Considered Afro-Latino? – nme.com

Why is Pop Smoke Considered Afro-Latino?

There are a few reasons why Pop Smoke is considered Afro-Latino. First, he was of Panamanian and Jamaican descent. Second, he was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, which has a large Latino population. Third, he frequently spoke Spanish in interviews and on social media. Fourth, he collaborated with many Latino artists, such as Anuel AA and Quavo.

Pop Smoke’s music also contained elements of Latin American culture. For example, his song “Dior” samples the Brazilian funk song “Ta Tum Tum.” He also interpolated the reggaeton song “Baila Baila Baila” on his track “Invincible.” In addition, the music video for his song “Mood Swings” features Latino dancers and performers.

Pop Smoke’s music was a mix of drill, trap, and R&B. He was signed to Victor Victor Worldwide and Republic Records. He released his debut mixtape “Meet the Woo” in July 2019. The mixtape peaked at number seven on the US Billboard 200 chart. In November of 2019, he released his second mixtape “Back to the Woo.” The mixtape featured guest appearances from Lil Tjay and Quavo.

Pop Smoke’s debut studio album “Shoot for the Stars Aim for the Moon” was posthumously released in July of 2020. The album debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200 chart. It features guest appearances from Lil Baby, Tyga, Quavo, Roddy Ricch, King Combs, Karol G, and 50 Cent.

Pop Smoke’s Afro-Latino Identity in His Music

Pop Smoke’s Afro-Latino identity was a big part of his music. He often rapped about his experience as a black man living in America. In the song “Dior,” he raps: “I can’t lie, I might go broke ’cause I’m buyin’ Dior/I can’t lie, these niggas wanna see me die for sure/I can’t lie, my niggas is ridin’ with them Glocks for sure/I can’t lie, the red dots on my back make me stop and think.” In this song, Pop Smoke talks about how he is constantly targeted by police because he is a black man. He also talks about how his friends are always carrying guns because they feel like they have to protect themselves from violence.

In the song “Gangstas,” Pop Smoke raps about how he is proud of his Afro-Latino identity: “I’m from the slums where the killers come from/But we still alive so we still gon’ stunt/We don’t give a damn ’bout no race or no color/We just tryna eat ‘fore somebody else comes up.” In this song, Pop Smoke talks about how he comes from a tough neighborhood but that he and his friends are still able to succeed despite the odds stacked against them. He also talks about how he doesn’t care about race or ethnicity, he just wants to provide for himself and his community.

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Conclusion:

Pop Smoke was an American rapper who was shot and killed in February 2020. He was 20 years old. Pop Smoke considered himself to be both black and Latino. His music often contained references to his Afro-Latino identity. For example, in the song “Invincible,” he raps: “I’m black and I’m Puerto Rican, so I’m Afro-Latino.” Pop Smoke’s Afro-Latino identity was a big part of his music.

In the song “Dior,” he raps: “I can’t lie, I might go broke ’cause I’m buyin’ Dior/I can’t lie, these niggas wanna see me die for sure/I can’t lie, my niggas is ridin’ with them Glocks for sure/I can’t lie, the red dots on my back make me stop and think.” In the song “Gangstas,” Pop Smoke raps about how he is proud of his Afro-Latino identity: “I’m from the slums where the killers come from/But we still alive so we still gon’ stunt/We don’t give a damn ’bout no race or no color/We just tryna eat ‘fore somebody else comes up.” Pop Smoke’s music was a mix of hip-hop and drill. The drill is a style of rap that originated in Chicago. It is characterized by its dark, violent, and often aggressive lyrics.

Pop Smoke was a young rapper who was on the rise when he was tragically killed in February 2020. He was only 20 years old. Pop Smoke considered himself to be Afro-Latino because of his Jamaican heritage. His music was a mix of the drill, trap, and R&B. He released his debut studio album “Shoot for the Stars Aim for the Moon” in July of 2020 which debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200 chart.

Pop Smoke is considered Afro-Latino because of his Panamanian and Jamaican descent, his Brooklyn upbringing, his use of Spanish, and his collaborations with Latino artists. His music also contains elements of Latin American culture, further solidifying his status as an Afro-Latino rapper.

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